Resources

News

Member Agency Director Brian Philson Honored

November 7, 2010 • From Ingham County Community News

philson.jpgONONDAGA - Highfields President/CEO Brian Philson has received Spring Arbor University's (SAU) 2010 Professional Excellence Alumni Award.

Philson was recognized for his contributions to the juvenile justice profession and community and for achieving previous honors at SAU. Recipients of the award must be established professionally for at least five years and must have membership in one professional organization. Philson earned a bachelor's degree in social work from SAU in 1985 and a master's in social work from Michigan State University. He has been recognized nationally for his work in juvenile justice, including the 2007 Individual Award for Excellence from the Juvenile Justice Trainers Association. He is the past recipient of SAU's Young Leader Award and the Adult Studies Faculty of the Year Award.

FYI • November 5, 2010 • No. 22

FYI • November 5, 2010 • No. 22
The next FYI bulletin will be issued November 19, 2010

HIGHLIGHT OF THE WEEK

Election Day 2010 has passed! Michigan’s Executive, Judicial and Legislative branch leaders have been chosen. As with any new transition in leadership and administration, the challenges ahead loom large, and the Federation staff and members are poised to assure that critical issues and responsible resolutions also loom large on the new leaders’ agendas, which will involve a major educational effort on our part. Focused advocacy continues with the present state leadership; see updates below.

EXECUTIVE/ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIVITIES
• Adoption Contract negotiations update—Federation Executive Director Janet Reynolds Snyder and representatives from Bethany Christian Services, Catholic Social Services of Oakland County, Child & Family Services of Northeast Michigan, Ennis Center for Children, Methodist Children’s Home Society, Oakland Family Services, Orchards Children’s Services, Spaulding for Children, Spectrum Human Services, and Wolverine Human Services met on November 1 with DHS representatives Deb Buchanan, Suzanne Stiles Burke, Kate Hanley, and Anita Peters. Given the governor’s veto of the adoption rate increase in the DHS Budget bill and the department’s support of that veto, DHS representatives made it clear that it is the department’s belief that no adjustments are needed in the adoption contract rates, effectively ending the negotiating meeting. The private agency representatives stayed and continued their discussion of the issues and next steps, including a proposal for specific contract modifications. Specific recommendations that address the adoption rate issue and contract language will be submitted by the Federation to DHS on Monday, November 8.

Broad Support for New Report Showing Significant Need for Post-Adoption Services

PostAdopPic.jpg

NEW YORK, Oct. 21, 2010 – An extensive examination of adoptive families in the United States, released today, concludes that too many are not receiving the essential services they need, and calls for a reshaping of national priorities and resources to develop and provide such services.

In an effort to demonstrate the breadth of professional support for a “paradigm shift,” major child welfare and adoption organizations across the country joined in endorsing the 98-page report, which was researched and published by the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute and is entitled “Keeping the Promise: The Critical Need for Post-Adoption Services to Enable Children and Families to Succeed.”

The report stresses that the vast majority of adopted children function normally – and their parents are highly satisfied with their families. But it also points out that just over the past 15 years, nearly a million boys and girls were adopted by Americans from foster care in our country and from orphanages abroad, and the majority of U.S. adoptions continue to be of those types (by far, mostly from state child welfare systems).

Large disparities found in giving babies the Right Start

KidsCountLogoNearly half of Michigan’s babies are born to mothers in cities or communities larger than 25,000. And many of those children start life without equal opportunities to thrive, arrive at school ready to learn and go on to become part of a highly educated workforce, according to “Right Start in Michigan 2010 – The Other Half.”

The report, released by the Michigan League for Human Services’ Kids Count in Michigan project, looks at eight indicators of maternal and infant health across 69 communities of populations of at least 25,000. It sorts those communities by risk, finding that two of every five births were in high-risk communities, including most racial minority births. It also found large disparities based on race and poverty.

FYI • October 22, 2010 • No. 21

FYI • October 22, 2010 • No. 21
The next FYI bulletin will be issued November 5, 2010

HIGHLIGHT OF THE WEEK

Meetings scheduled to address urgent budget/contract matters Scheduled earlier this month and then postponed by DHS, on October 26, Federation President Gary Tester and Federation Executive Director Janet Reynolds Snyder will meet with DHS Director Ismael Ahmed and have invited to join them in this meeting Michael Williams, representing Orchards Children’s Services and the Association of Accredited Child and Family Agencies. Matters of critical importance that will be discussed include residential, foster care and adoption contract issues, the governor’s veto of the adoption rate increase in the DHS Budget, and implementation of “failure to report.”
That same day, a special meeting will be hosted by Sen. Bill Hardiman and Rep. Dudley Spade with top DHS officials, the Federation’s Gary Tester and Janet Reynolds Snyder, and Michael Williams to discuss the governor’s veto and resulting issues.

Pages

Reports

Dr. Gary Anderson, director of MSU's School of Social Work, has made available several research reports and a resource booklet issued in recent years by the School. While additional reports will be added eventually, at this point, you can download the following items by clicking on the title:  

Michigan’s progress in helping foster youths aging out of care will get national exposure at the second meeting of the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices Policy Academy Nov. 28-30 in Miami, FL.

LANSING -- A 21-step action plan - based on recommendations from - foster care youths - will improve health care, education, job opportunities and resources for young people aging out of foster care, according to a report released to the Michigan Legislature today by the Michigan Department of Human Services (DHS).

About 450 youths in Michigan left foster care, or "aged out," at age 18 during 2005. These young adults are at greater risk for poverty, homelessness, unemployment and other negative outcomes. In January 2006, DHS director Marianne Udow and Supreme Court Justice Maura Corrigan convened a task force to evaluate existing services for foster youth and propose improvements.

Annual Report to the Membership 2005 Click here to discover how collaboration, networking and influence equal VALUE for Federation members.

Pages

Share this