Through its Children of Color Outreach program, the Minnesota Department of Human Services has published a tool entitled, A Practice Guide for Working with African American Families in the Child Protection System. The publication is meant to help social workers address the systemic overrepresentation of African American children and families involved in child protective services.

A new poll by Zogby International, and commissioned by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD) the oldest criminal justice research organization in the U.S. – shows that the public is concerned about youth crime, but strongly supports rehabilitation and treatment, not prosecution in the adult court or incarceration in adult jails or prisons. Major findings from the survey of likely voters included:

Groups wishing to order the Parent Resources for Information, Development and Education (PRIDE) Participant Handbooks for Michigan DHS-contracted agencies, may do so through Spaulding for Children. Cost for quantities of 20-100 is $23 each; for quantities of 101 or more, $20 each. Minimum order is 20, unit prices do not include shipping. To order, contact George Miller, Consultant, Spaulding for Children, (248) 443-2108.

There are often issues of school personnel and other mandated reporters' obligation to report suspected child abuse to Children's Protective Services. The Chance at Childhood Program at MSU has put together this very brief, excellent resource brochure for school personnel about reporting suspected child abuse and neglect.

Dr. Gary Anderson, director of MSU's School of Social Work, has made available several research reports and a resource booklet issued in recent years by the School. While additional reports will be added eventually, at this point, you can download the following items by clicking on the title:  

Michigan’s progress in helping foster youths aging out of care will get national exposure at the second meeting of the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices Policy Academy Nov. 28-30 in Miami, FL.

LANSING -- A 21-step action plan - based on recommendations from - foster care youths - will improve health care, education, job opportunities and resources for young people aging out of foster care, according to a report released to the Michigan Legislature today by the Michigan Department of Human Services (DHS).

About 450 youths in Michigan left foster care, or "aged out," at age 18 during 2005. These young adults are at greater risk for poverty, homelessness, unemployment and other negative outcomes. In January 2006, DHS director Marianne Udow and Supreme Court Justice Maura Corrigan convened a task force to evaluate existing services for foster youth and propose improvements.

Annual Report to the Membership 2005 Click here to discover how collaboration, networking and influence equal VALUE for Federation members.

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